Saturday, 31 March 2018

The Top 7 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer (Part 1 of 3)

You know your dentist is looking for cavities during regular check-ups, but you may not realize your dentist can check for cancer at the same time. It’s estimated that approximately 51,540 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue in 2018.

Regular visits to your dentist can help you detect such cancers early, and changing a few potentially harmful habits may help reduce your chances of developing them. Read on to find out the top risk factors.











Gender 
Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer. The American Cancer Society attributes this to higher rates of alcohol and tobacco use by men, but says more men of a younger age are being diagnosed with HPV-related forms of oral cancer.











Age 
Most people who are diagnosed with oral cancer are 55 or older, according to the American Cancer Society. HPV-related oral cancers, however, are often diagnosed in people who are younger.  
 










To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Friday, 30 March 2018

Friday, 23 March 2018

Tuesday, 13 March 2018

Nutrition: What You Eat Affects Your Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Your mouth, teeth, and gums are more than just tools for eating. They’re essential for chewing and swallowing-the first steps in the digestion process. Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also that of your teeth and gums. In fact, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth. Here are a few helpful things to know about how what you eat can impact your dental health.

Diet and Tooth Decay
The foods you eat and the beverages you drink can have a direct influence on the incidence and progression of tooth decay, depending upon: 

  • The form of the food-whether it’s liquid, solid, sticky or slow to dissolve makes a difference. 
  • How often you eat sugary foods and beverages and how often you eat or drink acidic foods and beverages. 
  • The nutritional makeup of the food. 
  • The combination of the foods you eat and the order in which you eat them. 
  • Medical conditions you may have, such as gastrointestinal reflux and eating disorders, which can increase risk of cavities and weaken teeth.

How Snacking Affects Your Dental Health
For dental health, it’s recommended that people limit eating and drinking between meals. Of course, sometimes eating between meals must happen. Unfortunately, most people choose foods like sweets and chips for snacks; foods that harm teeth by promoting tooth decay. If you do snack, make it a nutritious choice-such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, vegetables or nuts-for your overall health and the health of your teeth. Did you know that certain foods can put you at risk for cavities and other dental health problems? Here are some MouthHealthy tips.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Recommended Nutritional Guidelines
  • Foods That Harm Your Dental Health
  • Sugar and Your Dental Health
  • How Sugar Substitutes Affect Your Teeth
  • 4 Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Cavities

Better Image Dentistry
Drew Fairweather, DMD, Michael H. Dodd, DMD
21 Monroe Street
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 214-7686

BetterImageDentistry.com


Friday, 9 March 2018

Wednesday, 7 March 2018

5 Reasons Your Smile Is Stronger Than You Think

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

The right smile can leave you laughing, fill you with joy or make you melt with emotion. But, ultimately, the best smile is one that is healthy and strong. Here are some of the “tooth truths” about how tough your teeth really are ñ and how to keep them that way.

1. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the body.
The shiny, white enamel that covers your teeth is even stronger than bone. This resilient surface is 96 percent mineral, the highest percentage of any tissue in your body - making it durable and damage-resistant.    

2. Your bite is powerful!
Did you know your teeth can exert an average of 200 pounds of pressure when you bite down? That’s probably what tempts us to use our teeth as tools from time to time ñ but as your dentist will remind you, that’s one of the worst habits when it comes to preserving healthy teeth.    

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Teeth can last for hundreds of years
  • Strong as they are, teeth can't heal on their own
  • Healthy teeth have the power to resist decay, but they need our help

Friday, 2 March 2018